Quince Sale April 9th & 10th!

Quince is one of those fruits we look forward to all year long.  Now you can get your own jar of Quince poached in Vanilla Syrup and help our program raise funds for our new classroom.

Below you’ll find a quick slideshow telling our Quince canning story from last October which wouldn’t have happened without BiRite’s Shakirah Simley, who knew a generous owner of quince tree in the North Bay, a tree that needed serious harvesting. Thank you both so much!

Please stop by BiRite Market one of the next few afternoons and buy some quince from us! We will be out front eager to give you a taste, and hopefully coax you into becoming a fan of quince too.  See you there!

Heat of the Kitchen Quince Sale Days:

  • BiRight Market: 3639 18th Street location
  • Thursday April 9th and Friday April 10th
  • 3- 5 or 6pm, until we sell out!

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Rain Dance Garden Work Party!

2015-03-11 08.28.11Help keep the rain dance going with us this Monday April 6th at John O’Connell High School 4-7pm!  CUESA has worked with the garden at this school for years and here is our chance to bring it back after a year of dormancy.  Heat of the Kitchen classes will then continue with the garden until our move back to Ida B. Wells.  A great opportunity for us to continue a hands-on connection with work and food!

Spring Break

2015-03-13 12.13.39It may not look that exciting, but our “safety net” map has been a through-line  for me this past quarter.  We are on break this week, which I hoped would give me a break too, to get a sense of whether the students are getting anything out of our “no cooking” culinary careers classwork.  On this map, students circled areas of interest that they want to learn about in the 8 weeks we are together.

Even though you can’t see all the detail that was circled in this picture, I like this map because it proves a point to me. Yes, young people want jobs, they want to be more secure and be able to make choices after high school, not be dealt with, which is how school still feels at this age for many of our students.

We’ve got some exciting projects that we hope will help students feel more prepared, confident, connected (keyword tip offs here: Quince!  Garden!).  The timing might be right, then again, it might not.  It doesn’t change our appreciation for those of you who are jumping in and getting involved.  Thank you.

Students notice even when they choose to stay on the sidelines and many of them move one step closer to getting involved as a result of your involvement. The message that comes with every volunteer or industry person who brings an opportunity to our school is that very important  “I care even though I don’t know you,” message. This message helps to offset the litany of other messages that inner city youth receive which default, intentionally or unintentionally, to lack of care or inability to care.

The more times our students witness that unconditional “I care” message, the more they can prepare to step outside what is defaulted to them.  This picture is one more sign to me that they want to do that. And, as we all send out our caring messages, what keeps me going is looking forward to when young people begin to realize how amazing they really are and get in touch with their own limitless potential.  This kind of discovery is awesome, isn’t it?  It is why our class is designed for students to be able to cook and eat together at that professional level. it is a catalyst right into opening those deeper discovery doors that too often are shut for our inner city youth.  Yes, I can’t wait to start cooking with them in a real kitchen again.

 

Ida B Wells at JOC week 3

idab outrage 10inch 300dpiI’m not sure who painted this, but it is my favorite rendition of Ida B. Wells.  Someone was smart enough to bring our Ida B. Wells posters and this painting here to John O’Connell High School, to decorate our hallways.

Here in week 3, we are still getting used to things. Two schools in one building must never be easy.  We know it is all for a good reason, to be able to return to our newly renovated school building in a year, made safe and more useable.  So with this move, each school wants to create a sense of community, and at the same time not lose each school’s unique character.  And how is it turning out?  So far the default has to serve the most amount of students consistently.  Ours being a smaller amount of students, means we must defer to the larger flow.  Ida B. Wells students  seem to be developing a stronger sense of separation, isolation, segregation.  Little things, like hearing the other school’s announcements (and what they have access to), to our problems with heat, broken shades, confusion in separate lunch times – these are all becoming bigger things.

We have been talking about characteristics and skills in our classes, as we build resumes. The most amazing characteristic I’ve seen in our students?  Is that even with the frustrations in all this change, they have a resilience in them.  Those that are coming to our classes still smile and/or say hello and are keeping our mutual respect.  You have to look for these silver linings, focus harder on those, while you repair what is not right.   That being said, the words on this painting were Ida B. Wells’ over a century ago.  And they are still true today.   There is still so much to fix.  ~posted 1 1/2 hours into lockdown

Planitudes on moving

culinary plan 2014 10inchI’ve spent the last few months preparing to move out of Ida B.Wells worrying about how to teach a culinary arts class without cooking.  “Well, it’s not really a culinary arts class,” I’ve always told people. It is a work simulation class using culinary as a theme.  Um, and that culinary part?  It is a huge part for me, bigger than I first thought.  It is what automatically connects us, automatically equalizes us, and with our combined efforts, feeds us on many levels.

I have been moping a little that I won’t have the thrill of the stove, the splash at the sink, or the pressure of the period ending bell to accomplish what we’ve been able to these last 5 years.  That and attitudes have been wafting through the halls, perhaps we might be assimilated into the larger school site that will host us?  After all, we are a small, alternative school floating quietly on a increasingly crowded sea of requirements. We don’t fit a mold for good reasons. But one can’t plan anything when your attitude focuses on impending doom.  Instead of planning, you develop a planitude – an attitude that distracts you, like a dark fog.

Then a few weeks ago, I got to sit down with the project team to go over the renovation plans as respects my classroom, a basement area that has been Ida B. Wells’ cafeteria over the last 30 years (although every year I’ve been there I’ve inched into a bit more of it).

And as I sat there, with all these experts, seeing on the official black and white architect’s layout that they are building a real Culinary Arts classroom, with a full hood and ansul system, I started to get excited.  All this trouble we are going through moving out is for good reason – our building is old and broken.  And I have proof on these pages (which I’ve been carrying around with me like a security blanket) that we’ll be able to support students who need an alternative better than ever when we return in 2016.  It really is happening.

Now to get back to teaching and taking care of the students moving with us, with all the value, respect and hospitality we can muster.  There will still be bumps in the road, but it is heartening to see a glimpse into our future like this one.

little surprises

dec 14 romanesco 72dpi

… and we thought they were collard greens! Meet romanesco, one of the more wonderful displays of the Fibonacci sequence out there.  And there are now over a dozen of these happy little fractals in our school garden, quietly growing in the rain.

While we are actively packing to move out of our building in a week and a half (more on that later), signs like this sure are welcome!

Quarter 2 MMMs (most memorable moments)

ltd plums 2014 octIt is always hard to capture pictures of our students as we lead into the Long Table Dinner, it is just too frantic.   But once things calmed down, I found a stack of index cards from our students, describing their most memorable moments from class that week.  Hands down it was the making (and tasting) of the upside down plum cake for our sixth Long Table Dinner Event on October 23rd. We used a flat of organic Last Chance plums from a local farmer’s market, they were delicious, and indeed the last plums of the season.

There is something magical about upside down cake.  ltd plum sugar 6inchYou have this butter-sugar mixture that you swear will not become caramel.  Then you place fruit on top of it, pour cake batter over it and cross your fingers as you slide the pans into the oven.

ltd6 dessert 2014More often than not, the magic of the fruit talks that butter-sugar mixture into melting into a luscious caramel.  It is an exciting moment as you invert the still-hot cake and watch this delicious mixture step down from the pan. If the fruit gets stuck to that pan bottom, just coax it out with a metal spatula – it is an easy repair job if you catch it right when it is coming out of the pan. We used smaller cast iron pans (#5), easier to handle when hot.

The recipe we used is easy to find (see below), which we adapted here and there, substituting some almond flour and creating a vegan version, using almond milk and applesauce for the dairy.

And for those wheat free guests?  We sliced fresh plums, tossed them in sugar and lemon juice, garnishing with dollops of cream. Link to Simply Recipe’s original recipe is here, with our gratitude!